Seen/Unseen: Stories into Creativity
A Film by by Wallace Boss

 Seen/UnSeen: Stories into Creativity (16 minutes, 2018, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, CA) is a film by Wallace Boss.  He is a seasoned documentarian whose career has focused on creativity.

The artists in Seen/UnSeen: Stories into Creativity are Doyle Foreman (sculpture), Edward Ramirez (photography) and Claire Thorson (painting).  In Seen/UnSeen you will get to hear each artist explore their studio or “in the world” process and how it shapes an artwork coming into being.  

A project of Museo Eduardo Carrillo,  Seen/UnSeen: Stories into Creativity  is part of a Santa Cruz County wide initiative titled Spoken/Unspoken.  Museo is committed to sharing the art and voices of contemporary artists.

The Spoken/Unspoken countywide collaborative venture was organized by Cabrillo Gallery and fueled by the generosity of a donor-advised grant from the Roy and Frances Rydell Visual Arts Fund at Community Foundation Santa Cruz County, which allowed this project to come into being.  Find out more here:

Through a myriad of practices, artists give voice to a broad array of ideas, feelings, and concerns.  They invite us to think, to feel, to wonder, to question, to act and react. Through art, artists can shout dissent, rally for a cause, incite action, and foster community. Art can inform us, speak unspoken secrets and give a voice to the silenced. Art can offer comfort and a platform to communicate grief, anger, or injustice for those in difficult circumstances. Art can delight us aesthetically and touch us emotionally. It can express deeply personal thoughts and desires. Art can present puzzles to be solved or ambiguities to ponder.

Discover, through Wallace Boss’s film how  Doyle Foreman (sculpture), Edward Ramirez (photography) and Claire Thorson (painting) bring the Unseen into the Seen.

A free film screening of “Seen/UnSeen- Stories into Creativity” (16 minutes) and panel discussion with the artists and film maker will be hosted by The Sesnon Gallery in the Porter Faculty Gallery – Porter College at University of California, Santa Cruz on March 14th at 6PM.  Come early for best parking.  Please email for more information.

Seen/Unseen Gallery

Click thumbnail to enlarge


MEC launches DOC/UNDOC exhibit on Google Cultural Institute

Museo Eduardo Carrillo is pleased to announce the launch of DOC/UNDOC Documentado/Undocumented Ars Shamánica Performática on Google Cultural Institute.
DOC/UNDOC is the brainchild of book artist and publisher Felicia Rice, and includes work of performance artist Guillermo Gómez-Peña, art historian Jennifer González, sound artist Zachary Watkins, video artist Gustavo Vazquez, and of course Rice herself, functioning as a printmaker, book artist, and publisher. Under Rice’s direction, they collectively produced what González characterizes as a “Gesamtkunstwerk”—a total work of art.

As a Partner with the Google Cultural Institute’s Art Project, Museo joins 250 of the world’s most acclaimed art institutions on the world stage, including San Paulo Street Art, Brazil; Musee D’Orsay, Paris; Museo Nacional de Arte, Mexico; and Tokyo National Museum, Japan. We are honored to be able to feature DOC/UNDOC on GCI!


The launch of the exhibit on GCI corresponds with the publication of the trade paperback version of the original limited edition art book at the heart of Doc/Undoc. This City Lights Books and Moving Parts Press trade edition presents the journey of DOC/UNDOC in a widely accessible, affordable book that not only documents the original collaborative artists’ book, but also provides a reader with their own interactive, immersive experience. The book is available for purchase here.

Testament of The Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo on view January 21, 2018 -June 3, 2019

Museo Eduardo Carrillo is pleased to start 2018 by sharing news of the Carrillo retrospective.  The traveling exhibition Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo begins January 21st at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. 

Exhibition dates:

Pasadena Museum of California Art: January 21 – June 3, 2018
Crocker Art MuseumJune 24 – October 7, 2018
Triton Museum of Art: October 27, 2018 – January 27, 2019
American University Museum: April 6 – June 1, 2019

Exhibitions such as this cannot happen without the imagination, focused skill and planning, and hands on work of so many.  

Museo thanks:

  • Our guest curator Susan Leask and Associate Curator at the Crocker Art Museum, Kristina Gilmore. THEY MADE IT HAPPEN.  Profound thanks.
  • Lial Jones, ­Mort and Marcy Friedman Director and Scott Shields Associate Director and Chief Curator of the Crocker Art Museum who in 2008 envisioned this retrospective. 
  • Our team at the Pasadena Museum of California Art, starting with Susana Batiste, Executive Director and the energetic, “all things are possible” staff. They assembled an advisory team whose vision embraces activities in the community like the re-dedication of Carrillo’s “El Grito” mural in downtown Los Angeles. More to come.
  • Our catalog essayists who bring vivid and thoughtful ideas to Carrillo’s art. Philip Bookman, Dr.Gilberto Cardenas, Maureen Davidson, Michael Duncan,  Timothy Drescher PhD,  Susan Leask,  Dr. Amalia Mesa-Bains,  Tere Romo and Christina Waters PhD. 
  • The Carrillo Family and our circle of lenders who have generously allowed their pieces to leave home for the extensive year and a half tour.  
  • James Pennuto, master conservator, who restored long hidden works, reviving Carrillo’s bright array of colors.
  • Wilted & Taylor Publishing Services, the publishers of the catalog who fell in love with Carrillo’s art. It shows in every page.
  • The shipping team ATT Howe who made sure that all the far-flung works were provided safe transit.

We thank them all who have made this dream come true.


Alison Carrillo, Founder    
Betsy Anderse, Executive Director
Museo Eduardo Carrillo

Slow Looking produces evocative writing by teens in response to Latinx Art.

The message I see in this painting is that we are all the same, no matter how or what you believe. Everyone in the world has something in common; it is that we are all human beings and that we should treat and respect each other equally.

Unfortunately, people have fights mostly because of what they believe or what they are. Back in the third grade, kids would say horrible things about my family and about where we came from. I was a little kid and didn’t know how to react to the awful things being said about the language we spoke. So I sat there and took it all in. I had to endure all these hurtful statements until I found a friend whose family also came from the same state in Mexico, Oaxaca.

I never told my family about these insults because I was afraid of how they would react, that they might tell the parents of the mean kids to stay away from me, and that it might cause trouble between all the parents. My parents weren’t that worried about me because they were working so much; I didn’t want to worry them.

People fight over the racism in this country, and I just hope one day everybody will see each other like brothers and sisters. We should all be free to be who we want to be and not be made fun of simply because we are different or come from a different place.

—J.L. , age 13, Watsonville California.
Excerpt from the forthcoming book, La Historia en el arte:  The Story in the Art.

 Students were given the chance to look slowly at Latinx Art curated by Museo Eduardo Carrillo. They then used that artwork as the inspiration for their writing. Working with the guidance of mentors trained by the Young Writers Program, they produced writing that was introspective and poignant.

Working in collaboration, Museo and the Young Writers Program have developed a classroom unit based on curated works by contemporary Latino/a artists. These thought-provoking images are a stimulus to teens for writing personal narratives under the guidance of their Young Writers Program-trained mentors. The 8-10 week unit results in full-color, hardbound books that demonstrate how fine Latino/a art and its cultural content can evoke strong emotional and intellectual connections and inspire a young writer. A third book will soon be made available. Preview the books and find out more in the Educator Resources section of our website or purchase from Bookshop Santa Cruz.

How Seeing Less Is Seeing More: Slow Art Day featured in the Wall Street Journal

Museo will be participating again this year – look for our invitation to explore the art of Frank Galuszka  on Slow Art Day, Saturday April 8th

Slow Art Day is an international movement to encourage slow looking and conversation. Look for our invitation to get your cell phones out and participate this Saturday – opening at 6am and continuing all day.

Click to preview or read the article in the Wall Street Journal:

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Going High

On behalf of the collaboration between Young Writers Program, Pajaro Valley Arts and Museo Eduardo Carrillo, we are proud to share this letter of thanks from Michelle and Barack Obama.

They received the educational materials based on Latinx Art which grew from partnership.

The two full color books “The Art of Who I Am” and “Hablamos Juntos: together we speak” exemplify how cross pollination between Latinx art and the significant writing mentor ship provided through the YWP can bring out the deepest feelings and profound reflections in fine writing by our community teens.

We continue. Together. 

Yes, We Can.


Invisible Music: Eduardo Carrillo

Memories of the Artist I Knew
Article by Christina Waters in Catamaran Literary Magazine

Even now, almost twenty years after his death, it’s difficult to separate the man from his work. Both burned brightly, bursting with energy. Now only the paintings remain.

I was drawn to Eduardo Carrillo even before I realized that he was an extraordinary painter. Warm and genuinely comfortable in his skin, Ed personified the laid-back spirit of this coastal stretch of California. Although his ances – tral roots were in Baja, he was quite willing to pepper his unpretentious persona with plenty of Los Angeles hipness when the occasion required

Read the full article»

Museo Wins $10,000 Rydell Award Grant from Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County

Museo Eduardo Carrillo has received a grant of $10,000 from the Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County to fund the First Watsonville Art Walk from September 3- November 3,  according to Museo’s Executive Director, Betsy Andersen.


The Art Walk will feature the “Hablamos Juntos: together we speak/ Contemporary Latino Broadsides” series. Artists will be attending. It is a major educational project of Museo Eduardo Carrillo and Pajaro Valley Arts. The banners show Latino art in an array of mediums from artist throughout California. The series will be expanding. Each banner has text in English and Spanish, written by teens in the Young Writers Program.

Reception begins at Pajaro Valley Arts, 37 Sudden St, Watsonville at 6PM on September 16.

The grant from the Foundation gives us the resources to create a self guided walking tour and map in which Latino art is the main feature. This free event allows unlimited access to the art. We’re ecstatic about the support and vote of confidence from the Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County and fiscal sponsorship through Arts Council Santa Cruz County!